The forest on their plates

A woman from the Tolia Kond community in Odisha prepares mandua (ragi millet) porridge for the family’s morning meal. Traditional Adivasi diets are rich in a variety of indigenous grains. Photo: Anuradha Sengupta

The sun flits in and out of the clouds, spotlighting the hills around Muniguda and Bissam Cuttack blocks in Rayagada district, Odisha. Their emerald green colour is so resplendent and bright that it almost hurts your eyes.

The sound of laughter and conversation bounces off the houses and trees at Khalpadar village nestled in the base of the hills. Music can be heard. A goat has been butchered for a community meal. I have arrived in the middle of some festivities.

The forests that surround these villages have for years been a vital support system for tribal communities across Rayagada, providing food, medicine, fodder, fuel wood and water. Generations had grown rain-fed millet and vegetables here, until the government set its sights on the land. Large chunks of forest were chopped down by the forest department to make way for cash plantations like teak, eucalyptus and timber.

That is when the women in these villages decided to take on the responsibility of protecting their forests. Today, thanks to their efforts, the hills are flourishing again with indigenous trees, plants and flowers. This, in turn, has brought back diversity to their plates.

“When they came to persuade us to plant eucalyptus and teak, we refused. They said ‘paisa zyada milega’ (you will get more money),” says Timoli Kurunjelika. “But we had seen that these trees suck the life out of surrounding areas. No roots can grow; no tubers, mushrooms or fruits. The soil gets damaged too. But the forest department insisted and planted their own trees. Three years later, all the native plants in the undergrowth and the trees were destroyed.”

This is when the diet of the tribal people in these villages began to suffer. The children did not get enough nutrition. The women decided that, despite the offer of money, instead of enabling the destructive development of their forests and hills, which they call Bamni Boirohoru, they would pave the way for a more sustainable future. They began to see that the new forest policy had led to malnutrition in their communities and they got down to get back what they had lost.

The first thing they had to do was reclaim their millet-growing fields. “We decided to cut down plantation trees and replant our traditional crops — dates, mangoes, moa, jackfruit, tamarind,jaamkoli,” says Balo Shikoka. “The forest officials informed the police, who said we have to go to prison for this. We said we will go. All of us — women, children, elders — will stay in jail. We will go to prison for the jungle. But when we stay there, we won’t eat your city food. Give us our mandua (finger millets). The forest guys quietly left. There was no sign of them till last month. They came again. We told them ‘You know what we think. They left again’.”

It’s the women who are leading the change, going around telling other villagers to replant their forests. Last year, in nearby Nanduwadi, the forest department planted eucalyptus nurseries. The villagers went to the officials to reason with them. When repeated requests failed, the villagers cut the eucalyptus trees and set them on fire. “One afternoon, the police came in two vans,” recounts Sukhomoti Shikoka. “Most of us were in the forest or in the fields. Two women in the village ran and informed us. We all went running with laathis — women, men, elders, and youth. The police left. The entire village had protested. Finally, the forest department agreed to plant saplings of indigenous trees.”

It requires a lot of work to bring back diversity. The trees take at least five years to grow. The soil, damaged by plantations, takes time to replenish and thrive again.

The Adivasi women have formed informal groups to monitor the jungles and informal rules for gathering forest produce. “This year — from June to July alone — we have regrown jungles in 35 villages in Muniguda block,” says Sukhomoti. “About 6,000 families from Muniguda to Bissam Cuttack are involved — each planting 10 to 15 trees. Now the nutrition needs of our children will be met, even after the rains.”

Living Farms, a non-government organisation working in the region on food and nutrition security, conducts assessments of dietary diversity every six months. In 2014, the number of families with low nutrition levels was 58 per cent. Now it is 18 per cent. “A major area of focus is to link agriculture, natural resource management, and nutrition,” says Bichitra Biswal of Living Farms. “In the last couple of years, we’ve come to realise that government schemes like ICDS cannot ensure nutrition security. Chhatua, midday meals, eggs — these are supplements. In Rayagada area, we have traditionally had immense food diversity — many varieties of pulses, millets, grains, fruits, vegetables, greens and mushrooms. We need to protect this, not destroy it.”

A typical diet for an adivasi family starts with millet porridge. Lunch is another variety of millet, with wild onions, greens like gondri saag, foraged from the jungle, sometimes mushrooms, meats or fish. In the evening, they have rice, vegetables, pulses and cowpeas. The women talk about a time not so long ago when their diets were richly varied. Kosla, gurji, jari, sua, fruits, birds, animals, insects. They would eat the seeds of mango and tamarind, and roasted, ground roots.

They also depend on the forest for healing. One woman hurries off and comes back with a bunch of leaves and roots. She lists out their medicinal benefits. One stems bleeding, these roots control diarrhoea, this one is for toothache…

“My daughter knows what to do for toothaches,” says Landi Shikoka. “She has treated many people in the village. Her jejema (grandmother) taught her. The knowledge is passed from one generation to another. And the people are chosen. Jejema did not tell me, she chose my daughter, who has always had a knack for identifying plants and spends a lot of time in the jungles and hills. Once a man came from outside asking for treatment. ‘Are you sure it will heal me’, he asked. I said, ‘daat na theek kortey parley, pahaar niye niyo (if your tooth doesn’t get better, you can take our hill).”

All this slowly vanished when the city people came. “They’d say ‘Yeh cheez ghatiya hai’. They thought we were moorkh (stupid). Someone in a pant-shirt would ask what we eat and be disgusted when we told him.” This hurt their sense of identity and pride. Then, when their children travelled to towns for education, they were exposed to another kind of food. “They started asking for soya nuggets and Maggi.”

“We noticed that the adivasis had developed an inferiority complex about their diet,” says Biswal. In order to combat the growing alienation from traditional food systems, Living Farms began organising a series of local food festivals in the villages to showcase the richness on their plates. Indigenous seeds and recipes were shared. Children and youth saw the diversity of their food. This has brought back pride in traditional food systems and the community has realised how the forest is a major source of their food. “Adivasis know about the jungle,” says Landi Shikoka. “When adivasis disappear, so will the knowledge, and the forests and the hills.”

[Source:-The Hindu]

Glow like a glow worm-Jaltee

A Jaltee creation

Jaltee hai (It glows). That’s the latest clothesline Jaltee Wearable is all about. Jaltee means glowing in Hindi to the layman, but the brain behind it say it is actually an acronym and each alphabet represents the name of inspiring persons who brought in revolutionary changes in the world. – Steve Jobs/Isaac Asimov/LinusTorvalds/Nikola Tesla/Thomas Edison/Albert Einstein.

How does Jaltee stands out in the midst of the hundreds of clothing brands? “The idea is to focus on creating clothing that is technology enabled and user-friendly. With the help integrating the creativity of designers and know-how of an engineer we have created these clothes which will make heads turn,” says Ayyappa Nagubandi, the mind behind Jaltee.

Remember Amitabh Bachchan dancing to the song ‘Sara Zamana’ in Yarana? Jaltee looks somewhat like that but it is most aesthetically designed and created. It is non bulky, doesn’t use LED and has intricate designs that glow in the dark.

If it doesn’t use LED, then how does Jaltee glow? “ELD or the Electro Luminescent Display is a type of display which is created by sandwiching a layer of electroluminescent material between two layers of conductors. When current flows, the layer of material emits radiation in the form of visible light.

Electroluminescence (EL) is an optical and electrical phenomenon where a material emits light in response to an electric current passed through it, or to a strong electric field. The wire is flexible and light, which allow us to work on the various designs and patterns on the fabric,” explains Ayappa.

To make it more attractive and meet the ultimate goal of being a show stopper at any event or party, the dresses are all made using various types of silk. The reason silk is used, is to bring out the richness of the embroidery and the stone work on the motifs. In between this embroidery are ELD wires that form a part of the design.

“Be it the T shirt that glows in the dark or the Salwar Kameez that lights up the room or the bag which changes the design on it as per your wish and command. Jaltee fuses technology with everyday clothing and creates magic,” adds Ayappa.

What makes Jaltee different from the glowing strips on fitness apparels? Ayyappa explains, “Fitness apparels make use of radium that reflects light. Jaltee emits it own light with the help of a circuit that functions with AAA battery.”

Priced between Rs. 4500-Rs. 5000, Jaltee is available on online at www.jaltee.com and is quite timely to make one glow for the dandiya season.

[Source:-The Hindu]

Bengaluru’s birders take wing

On the lookout for birds in the urban jungle

Bengaluru is a birders’ paradise and the ever-growing community of birdwatchers are observing the third Bengaluru Bird Day this October 1 with a day filled with talks and workshops.

The day marks the birth anniversary of Joseph George, who is considered the pioneer of group birdwatching efforts in India. He started an informal birdwatching group in Bengaluru in 1972 called the Birdwatchers’ Field Club of Bangalore, which, with the passage of time and the birth of technology also branched into the online Yahoo group “bngbirds” by 1999. Joseph George, an organic chemist, had many research papers on birds to his credit. He started group bird watching activities as early as the 1940s in Dehra Dun, where he was posted at the Forest Research Institute. Veteran birders remember him for the way he encouraged them to make their own observations, always emphasising that contributions to a knowledge base on birds could be done by anyone, and not just scientists.

On October 1, the birders’ group, along with Ecoedu, a group that promotes environment education, are organising Bengaluru Bird Day at Venkatappa Art Gallery, Cubbon Park. Today the city’s online group has over 3,000 members who meet regularly for birdwatching, says avid birder Ulhas Anand, founder of Ecoedu, and one of the organisers.

Two of the interesting talks planned are by Shubha Bhat and Shashank Dalvi. Homemaker Shubha, who lives on the Indian Institute of Science campus will talk on “My Experience with Bird Baths”. Having set up a water bowl and a feeder in her backyard five years ago, she has documented more than 50 species of birds from her kitchen, including some rare and new records for Bengaluru, such as the Kashmir Flycatcher and Tickell’s Thrush.

“Birder on the Road” is Shashank Dalvi’s talk about his “Big Year” — a term used by birders when one takes a year off work to watch birds, says Ulhas. “The idea was to journey across India and see as many species of birds as possible within the country in one calendar year. He ended up seeing a phenomenal 1,128 species of birds, perhaps the highest ever by an Indian,” says Ulhas.

This year the “Dr. Joseph George Memorial Talk — From Birdwatching to Nature Walks” will be given by popular conservationist and educationist Karthikeyan S. He will trace the relationship that Bengaluru’s birdwatchers have had along with the birds, slowly expanding over the last four decades to watching out more holistically for other forms of biodiversity around them, including plants, tress, ants and butterflies. “All these elements are around you when you go birdwatching. It was basic curiosity that started off among early birdwatchers when there was no internet access, no digital photography, or enough field guides,” explains Ulhas.

Ramit Singal of eBird India portal, which is a popular resource for birders in India and where bird lists and constantly updated, will talk on “How to Observe Difficult Birds in the Field and Identify them”.

Two workshops are also being held — “Birds in a Sketchbook” where nature artists Sangeetha Kadur and Shilpa Shree P. will take birders through a hand-on experience of how to capture bird behaviour in drawing. Birder L. Shyamal, one the most prolific contributor to the Wikipedia’s WikiProject Birds will conduct a workshop “I Searched Online and Found Nothing Useful”. The workshop will go into details of how naturalists can learn to utilise and contribute to Wikipedia and make submissions.

Bengaluru is a birders’ paradise and the ever-growing community of birdwatchers are observing the third Bengaluru Bird Day this October 1 with a day filled with talks and workshops.

The day marks the birth anniversary of Joseph George, who is considered the pioneer of group birdwatching efforts in India. He started an informal birdwatching group in Bengaluru in 1972 called the Birdwatchers’ Field Club of Bangalore, which, with the passage of time and the birth of technology also branched into the online Yahoo group “bngbirds” by 1999. Joseph George, an organic chemist, had many research papers on birds to his credit. He started group bird watching activities as early as the 1940s in Dehra Dun, where he was posted at the Forest Research Institute. Veteran birders remember him for the way he encouraged them to make their own observations, always emphasising that contributions to a knowledge base on birds could be done by anyone, and not just scientists.

On October 1, the birders’ group, along with Ecoedu, a group that promotes environment education, are organising Bengaluru Bird Day at Venkatappa Art Gallery, Cubbon Park. Today the city’s online group has over 3,000 members who meet regularly for birdwatching, says avid birder Ulhas Anand, founder of Ecoedu, and one of the organisers.

Two of the interesting talks planned are by Shubha Bhat and Shashank Dalvi. Homemaker Shubha, who lives on the Indian Institute of Science campus will talk on “My Experience with Bird Baths”. Having set up a water bowl and a feeder in her backyard five years ago, she has documented more than 50 species of birds from her kitchen, including some rare and new records for Bengaluru, such as the Kashmir Flycatcher and Tickell’s Thrush.

“Birder on the Road” is Shashank Dalvi’s talk about his “Big Year” — a term used by birders when one takes a year off work to watch birds, says Ulhas. “The idea was to journey across India and see as many species of birds as possible within the country in one calendar year. He ended up seeing a phenomenal 1,128 species of birds, perhaps the highest ever by an Indian,” says Ulhas.

This year the “Dr. Joseph George Memorial Talk — From Birdwatching to Nature Walks” will be given by popular conservationist and educationist Karthikeyan S. He will trace the relationship that Bengaluru’s birdwatchers have had along with the birds, slowly expanding over the last four decades to watching out more holistically for other forms of biodiversity around them, including plants, tress, ants and butterflies. “All these elements are around you when you go birdwatching. It was basic curiosity that started off among early birdwatchers when there was no internet access, no digital photography, or enough field guides,” explains Ulhas.

Ramit Singal of eBird India portal, which is a popular resource for birders in India and where bird lists and constantly updated, will talk on “How to Observe Difficult Birds in the Field and Identify them”.

Two workshops are also being held — “Birds in a Sketchbook” where nature artists Sangeetha Kadur and Shilpa Shree P. will take birders through a hand-on experience of how to capture bird behaviour in drawing. Birder L. Shyamal, one the most prolific contributor to the Wikipedia’s WikiProject Birds will conduct a workshop “I Searched Online and Found Nothing Useful”. The workshop will go into details of how naturalists can learn to utilise and contribute to Wikipedia and make submissions.

[Source:-The Hindu]

With STARS in her eyes

Aparna Balamurali Photo courtesy: Ajmal Latheef

Aparna Balamurali hasn’t yet come to terms with her celebrity status. She gushes about meeting Mohanlal, Vikram, Mammootty and meeting the who’s who of Malayalam cinema. She confesses that she becomes shy and embarrassed when fans come and greet her.

It has been a dream-like journey for Aparna, who is three films old, the latest being Oru Muthassi Gadha (OMG) that is getting good reviews.

The 21-year-old is super excited talking about her tryst with tinsel town. Her debut in Oru Second Class Yathra was low key, but she nailed it as the spirited, vivacious Jimsy opposite Fahadh Faasil in Maheshinte Prathikaram.

“Jimsy made me more responsible. I wasn’t very serious about movies till then. I had not decided about making a career as an actress. But Jimsy gave me so much of appreciation that it changed my life altogether,” says Aparna, a native of Thrissur.

When OMG was offered to her, Aparna says she had no reason to say no. “First it was a Jude Anthany movie. I loved his Ohm Shanthi Oshaana. It was fun shooting for the movie. Although he is know for being short-tempered, I was lucky that he never got angry with me. That is something I proudly tell everyone! The subject also appealed to me. Initially I had the role of only the grand daughter, Alice, of the lead character Leelamma (Rajini Chandy). Later I was offered to play Leelamma’s younger version as well,” she says.

The youngster adds that the movie has been a learning experience for her. “It has a social message for us youngsters. The situation that the grandmother is in can happen to any of us when we get old. That is perhaps why the movie has been loved by people of all ages,” she says.

Aparna, a trained classical singer, has crooned a duet in the movie with Vineeth Sreenivasan, incidentally picturised on the duo. “The song has me in a vintage look. I thoroughly enjoyed the making process of the song,” Aparna says. Aparna had earlier sung in Maheshinte Prathikaram and Pa. Va.

Music has been all around her during her growing up years. Her father, K. P. Balamurali, is a composer and has many albums to his credit, while her mother, Sobha Balamurali, a lawyer, has sung for a couple of movies. Also, K. P Udayabhanu is her father’s uncle. “Music is very much part of my life. I am now learning from Karthika Vaidyanathan,” she says. But if asked to choose between music and movies, it would be difficult. “It is through films that I became a singer, so I guess both are important for me.”

She is a trained dancer as well and has learnt dance for over a decade before she took a break to concentrate on studies. She is a third year student in architecture at Global Institute of Architecture at Palakkad. Incidentally it was through one of her teachers in college, Unnimaya (wife of scriptwriter Syam Pushkaran) that she got a chance to audition for Maheshinte Prathikaram.

“I opted for architecture because it calls for creativity. And it is when you learn the subject that you get to experiment a lot and try new things. That’s why I chose to learn the subject. However I have taken a break for a few months to complete some projects,” says Aparna.

Having done roles of substance, the youngster says that she can’t thank her stars enough.

“Till now I have done good roles, ones that are close to real life and bold as well. I have been really lucky on that front. Opportunities came my way before I knew it. I was not very nervous about facing the camera. Rather, I was not conscious about it. May be because I didn’t think a lot about what I was doing,” she says.

Aparna is currently doing two projects in Malayalam, Sarvopari Palakkaran with Anoop Menon andThrissivaperoor Kliptham with Asif Ali.

Meanwhile she will also be seen as a lead in two Tamil movies, 8 Thottakkal and an yet-untitled movie.

Short takes

* Aparna started out as a child artiste, in the movie Yathra Thudarunnu and a short film, Innalaye Thedi.

* She had her fan moment when she met her favourite actor Vikram and clicked a photo. Now she is waiting to meet her favourite actress, Nayantara, whom she absolutely adores for “her sheer screen presence and fashion sense.”

* Shreya Ghosal is her favourite singer “for her voice and being so versatile in all languages.”

[Source:-The Hindu]

It’s a double delight

Working and loving it

DINK is double income no kids. But is there an acronym for earning double by one person? One source of income to pay the bills and the other to follow one’s passion and this isn’t about art, dance or pursuing one’s interest alone.

These passions also include hardcore marketing, putting a business strategy in place and earning the moolah by knowing the risks involved in it.

Something that is required to do in a business. These are the bunch who face no Monday blues because they look for Monday evenings where there get on with life while pursuing their passion

Describing the fun in two incomes by one person, Sunita a restaurateur by the evening says, “The day job, helps maintain the lifestyle and brings in the money while the evening engagement lets me not to spend an evening at another café or home thinking about when do I do what I want to do. In short: my evenings are regret free. To follow my passion full throttle that is also self sufficient. I enjoy both. I am a people’s person and like the work that I do with a telecom company. It also taught me in a way to build and hone my business sense. My restaurant is a result of what I love to do. I was lucky to find a place that is just how I wanted my restaurant to be,” says Sunita.

An artist had a very logical explanation about juggling between a being banker and an artist, “As a banker I have work hours, but at home I make my time to spend at least three-hours with my art. If I am working on commissioned work I put in extra time. When we love something we will make that extra effort to pursue it, that happens only when we are passionate about it,” explains artists Asha Radhika.

Creative outlet

Sometimes following the passion isn’t about extra income alone.

It is a lot of creativity, utilising the business acumen and help creating something different. “To bring about a change in lifestyle. To be able to offer the best food and beverages and hope to be known as pioneers in creating an atmosphere that isn’t just cool and happening but is safe as well. All this comes from years of working in the food and beverage industry. It is challenging, interesting and involves a lot of innovation. It isn’t as simple as opening a hangout place,” says Sashi Kumar, who works in an IT company by the day and at night he manages an eatery with his talented and business-minded partner. Sashi feels his IT job is an equally challenging one and his business makes use of his business degree from a Business school. “I ain’t wasting any of my degrees,” he laughs.

But there is another passionate chef who works only to accumulate all his leaves to coach football to children during soccer camps. “I have always followed a strict routine for my game, earlier it used to be game and studies, now it’s game and work. But when I finally take my break I am off work and it is just my game,” he explains.

Does it pay well? “It pays in a different way, I always sign up for International soccer camps and it helps me see different countries. That is more than accumulating money in my bank. My job pays me well, so I don’t need to worry about anything as long as my international travel, stay and food is taken care of,” says Lakshit Shetty, a chef.

[Source:-The Hindu]

Health Highlights: Sept. 28, 2016

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Americas Declared Free of Endemic Measles

North, Central and South America are free of endemic measles, a global health organization declared Tuesday.

The Americas are the first region in the world to be free of endemic measles, which refers to cases of measles not brought in from other parts of the world. The last known case of endemic measles in the Americas was in 2002, according to the Pan American Health Organization, United Press International reported.

It took 14 years to declare the Americas free of endemic measles due to factors such as poor communication between health departments in various countries and unvaccinated migrant populations on the move, the health group said.

Measles can lead to pneumonia, blindness and in some cases can be fatal, UPIreported.

—–

Tyson Chicken Nuggets Recalled

More than 132,000 pounds of chicken nugget products are being recalled by Tyson Foods because they may contain pieces of hard plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) says.

The recall covers: 5-lb. bags of Tyson fully cooked panko chicken nuggets with a “Best If Used By” date of July 18, 2017 and case code 2006SDL03 and 2006SDL33 that were distributed nationwide; and 20-lb. bulk packages of “Spare Time Fully Cooked, Panko Chicken nuggets, Nugget Shaped Chicken Breast Pattie Fritters With Rib Meat” with a production date of July 18, 2016 and case code 2006SDL03 that were shipped for institutional use in Pennsylvania.

The recall was triggered by customer complaints about plastic pieces in the products. The pieces ranged in size from 0.8 inches in length and 0.25 inches in diameter and may have come from a plastic rod used to connect a plastic transfer belt, according to Tyson.

[Source:-Philly]

Americas declared free of measles; immunization, international cooperation praised

The Americas — North, South and Central — have been declared the first region of the world free of endemic measles by global health authorities on Tuesday.

Endemic measles (locally spread cases not brought in from elsewhere in the world) was last reported in the Americas in 2002. The disease can lead to blindness, pneumonia, and sometimes is fatal.

The Pan American Health Organization said the reason it took 14 years to make the declaration was because communication between the health departments of various countries was often poor. The group also cited warring factions and unvaccinated migrant populations on the move.

The measles outbreak linked to Disneyland in 2014 was quickly determined to have been brought in from outside the United States, thanks to advances in being able to track viral sources.

Despite the movement by some parents to avoid childhood vaccinations, experts point to strict vaccination programs as the main reason the declaration was made.

“Take the example of the country I come from,” said Dr. Merceline Dahl-Regis, the Bahamian-born chair of the International Expert Committee for Elimination in the Americas. “You have 400,000 people [living there] and six million people who come and visit the country – and we don’t have measles because of high immunization coverage.

“That’s the simple answer,” Regis said. “Poor, male, female, whatever the social class, everyone needs to be immunized. High coverage is how you prevent the reintroduction of measles.”

[Source:-UPI]

13 Ways To Deal With Unexpected Career Turns

Many people end up with jobs and lives they didn’t expect. If you’re unhappy with the direction your career has taken, however, not all is lost — changing your circumstances can start with a simple mindset shift.

We asked Forbes Coaches Council to provide one tip for achieving greater alignment between your passion and your daily work, especially considering that competition is often fierce and you may be forced to take a job you didn’t plan for. Their best tips are below.

13 Ways To Deal With Unexpected Career Turns

1. Find The Positive

Find which part of the job is aligned with your values and/or goals and focus on that. If you can build on the positive elements, you may be able to leverage opportunities you had not anticipated, such as skill building and networking. Focusing on the positive has a physiological impact too, so try to find the good regularly. – Maureen Metcalf, Metcalf & Associates, Inc
2. Think About Who Can Influence And Advocate For Your Next Role

There may be other roles you feel would be a better fit with your strengths and values, but here you are, so what can you learn? How can this role help you build the skills you need for the next job? Who can influence and advocate for your next role, and how can you build a relationship with him or her? Keep looking long term, and know this isn’t the last stop on your journey. – Teri Citterman, Talonn

3. Stay Connected To Your Dream

Although you may not be working directly in your industry, I would recommend that you still stay connected through professional associations, networking and professional development. Keeping up to date with new industry advancements is key. Also finding a way to practice your craft outside of your normal 9-5 will ensure that you stay connected and keep building your skills. – Jasmine Briggs, Creatively Inspired Coaching

4. Create The Narrative That Honors Your Choices 

You may have to make career choices that seem less than perfect. But you’re in charge of creating the story that binds your choices together and gives them meaning. In each job, there’s something that reflects your values and something to learn. Create your own hero’s journey —and build the story of how you’re moving forward — regardless of what it may look like to others.   – Sally Fox, Engaging Presence

5. Focus On Building The Pathway To Your Future Work 

It’s critical to get clear on what you do want from your work so you can create a plan to move toward it, and even take advantage of your current job to develop skills and experience. A future work strategy can quiet down those “stuck in the wrong job” gremlins, and transform your perspective by building a pathway to where you’re headed using where you are now.   – Shannon Bradford, Rich Work Zone

[Source:-Forbes]

Real Madrid’s Cristiano Ronaldo undecided on career in management

Cristiano Ronaldo does not want to become a manager when he retires, although he may change his mind in several years and pursue a career in the dugout.

Speaking after scoring his 98th European goal for Real Madrid in their 2-2Champions League draw against Borussia Dortmund on Tuesday night, the 31-year-old insisted he was focused on his playing career.

“I think a lot about it,” he is quoted as saying by AS. “Right now I don’t want to be a manager. In a few years people will say that I have the right profile but I don’t want to be.

“It’s too complicated. At the moment I just want to focus on my football, my passion. Nobody knows what the future holds.

“In five, six, seven years I might change my mind and become a manager.”

The question of management rose following Ronaldo’s animated performance in the Euro 2016 final in which he spent a large part of the game encouraging his teammates from the manager’s technical area having been forced out of Portugal’s game against France through injury.

Portugal’s victory followed on from Champions League success with Real, and Ronaldo believes the two honours combined to give him the best campaign of a distinguished career.

“Last year was probably my best season,” he said. “As far as titles go, I think so. Every year of my career has been incredible but this one was special.

“We won the first major trophy in Portuguese history and also because Real Madrid won the Champions League.”

Ronaldo would now like to become a member of the first team to retain the Champions League.

“I think we can win the Champions League twice in a row,” he said. “When you play for Real Madrid you have to believe that you can. We have a great team and a great manager. We have the experience from last year.

“We know it’s a tough competition and that you need a bit of luck but it’s a good challenge for us and the club. I’m confident that we can win it again.”

[Source:-ESPN]

Former Google career coach: 4 reasons why you shouldn’t try to please everyone

Former Google career coach Jenny Blake shares her best advice in "Pivot."

As a former career coach at Google and co-founder of the company’s career mentorship program, Jenny Blake knows what makes for a successful career.

Blake individually mentored over a thousand people at Google and now runs her own business and career strategy firm. She’s learned thatconstant people-pleasing can be detrimental to your career.

“People-pleasing and doing what friends or family or society would deem successful often keeps people stuck in place,” she told CNBC.

In her new book “Pivot,” Blake explains why you shouldn’t always follow the instinct to make others happy.

1. It’s tiring

“People-pleasing is exhausting,” Blake writes. “It is inauthentic. It means placing everyone else’s needs above your own.”

2. It’s not realistic

“You cannot make everyone happy all the time, and it is futile to try,” she says. “You are no good to anyone if you run yourself ragged trying to please everyone.”

3. It detracts from your own goals

“You have a choice: You can spend your time ceaselessly worrying about other people or you can bravely follow your own path,” Blake writes.

4. It could hurt your career

“The universe rewards backbone,” she writes. “Not speaking up or acting authentically may lead to a bigger explosion down the road, when you least want or expect it.”

Of course, Blake notes that it is important not to burn bridges in your career.

Instead, she recommends people always be friendly and a team player, but reiterates that obsessing over other’s thoughts and emotions is not helpful.

“You can either go emotionally broke running around trying to please everyone, or you can spend your time creating, being authentic to your own needs and desires, and then serving others from that full place,” she says.

[Source:-CNBC]